Category Archives: security

Linux Security Distros Compared: Tails vs. Kali vs. Qubes

Linux Security Distros Compared: Tails vs. Kali vs. Qubes by Thorin Klosowski via lifehacker-logo

Are you looking for the safest version of Linux? The best for your tasks?

Ask yourself why do you seek a Linux operating system with high performance in terms of security and test one of those Linux OS proposed in the link above.

I think they are the best Linux distributions today …. or does anyone have any better suggestion? If so, please write a comment below! Thank you.

If you use TAILS you should test a bit of HEADS alchemy

If you use TAILS you are certainly interested to better know HEADS because Heads isn’t simply another Linux distribution, it merges physical hardening of particular hardware platforms and flash protection attributes with a Linux boot loader in ROM as well as custom Coreboot firmware.

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The key factor in Heads is represented by its steady monitoring of the boot process that allows detecting if the firmware has been changed by malware.

If this first check certifies that all is unchanged, heads uses the TPM as a hardware key to decrypt the hard disk.

The certified integrity checking of the root filesystem is really effective against exploits but it doesn’t secure the system against each possible attack but it is able to effectively divert many types of attacks against the boot process and physical equipment that have usually been ignored in conventional setups, hopefully increasing the issue beyond what most attackers are willing to spend.

c3tv-bootstraping-a-slightly-more-secure-laptop

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Faking Your Death Online Is a Lot Harder Than It Used to Be by Roisin Kiberd via vice_motherboard_logo

“…But pseudocides are rarer in recent times. “Vanishing” oneself is more difficult; the world is simply too small a place now, connected as it is by social media and the surveillance it entails….”

“…Let’s say you are hiding in Japan, and a tourist takes a photo where you’re in the background,” he told me. “The photo is uploaded to social media and a week later, a cop uploads your photo into a facial recognition site like TinEye [a reverse-image search engine]. Boom—you’re busted, because TinEye will find your photo online…”

Test your VPN through Terminal – Linux Tips

computer-VPN

Do you use a VPN to connect to Internet and increase your privacy? If you are one of the many you would be sure that the VPN you are paying is really working properly.

You can always use, via browser, one of those dedicated websites that check your Ip and, in some cases, test the real effectiveness of VPN and/or use Terminal.

But, for my experience, if you prefer to test your public IP without using the Terminal, the best tutorial for this specific task has been published by http://www.tecadmin.net.

Get Public IP using Linux Terminal

Recommended!… if you are looking for an extra test that you can manage directly from Terminal.

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Is Computer Security Becoming a Hardware Problem? by Michael Byrne via vice_motherboard_logo

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How To See Everything Google Knows About You by Cadie Thompson via logo_work

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Courtesy of appsglossy.com

3 steps to install DNScrypt to improve your privacy – Ubuntu version

Also if you use OpenDNS to improve your standard of privacy, you are not protected by “last mile” dangers but you can boost your security installing DNScrypt on your digital device. DNScrypt “works by encrypting all DNS traffic between the user and OpenDNS, preventing any spying, spoofing or man-in-the-middle attacks”.

DNScrypt “is a protocol that authenticates communications between a DNS client and a DNS resolver” and it “is not a replacement for a VPN, as it only authenticates DNS traffic, and doesn’t prevent “DNS leaks”, or third-party DNS resolvers from logging your activity”.

For this reason you have to be conscious that DNScrpt is just a -very good- improvement of your privacy but not the definitive solution to all your privacy concerns.

DNScrypt is so versatile that you can install it on every kind of device you prefer. In fact it is possible to download DNScrypt for servers, IOS, OSX, Android, Windows and Linux computers (DNScrypt-proxy version). Obviously the installation and setup will vary a little depending the OS you installed on your device.

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Image from softpedia.com

Here we are talking about DNScrypt installation on Ubuntu.

For this purpose I suggest to use the Terminal that allows you to install DNScrypt i just 3 steps:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:anton+/dnscrypt
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install dnscrypt-proxy

Last but not least, you need to interface the Internet traffic of your computer through the DNScrypt-proxy. For this reason you have to Edit your Network Configuration and add the address 127.0.0.2 to the “DNS Servers” line as for the below screenshot:

DNSCrypt

Now you can start DNScrypt just typing:

sudo dnscrypt-proxy -R opendns -a 127.0.0.2:53 -u okturtles

Where, in my specific case, okturtles is the name of the remote DNS resolver I decided to use. I chose that specific risolver from the list I found into into my computer after DNScrypt-proxy installation:

/usr/share/dnscrypt-proxy/dnscrypt-resolvers.csv

As usual in similar situations, you may want to spend another couple of minutes to configure your computer to start DNScrypt at the computer boot. Open the Session and Startup manager through the desktop Dash and Add this specific command to the Application Autostart menu:

sudo dnscrypt-proxy -R opendns -a 127.0.0.2:53 -u dnscrypt