Category Archives: Fedora

3 things you need to remember when Upgrading to Fedora 23 as for the Unicmen’s instructions

The upgrade from Fedora 22 to Fedora 23 is not automatic, as usual in my Fedora experience, but it is really simple to manage if you follow the path suggested by Unixmen.

There are few things you need:

connect your laptop to the power plug (if you use a laptop);

– a couple of hours (something more or less depending on your CPU, RAM, Internet connection speed, etc..);

few lines of commands on the Terminal

The upgrading process is well structured and to start it you need to launch Terminal and upgrade the native Fedora Fedup with its new version that now is integrated into DNF:

dnf upgrade

Then you have to install the DNF plugin:

dnf install dnf-plugin-system-upgrade

and finally you can start the “core” part of the upgrade just typing:

dnf system-upgrade download –releasever=23 –allowerasing –best 

Where:

– allowerasing will continue the upgrade also in presence of any “old” (not yet upgraded) third part repositories that normally would have completely stopped the main upgrading process

-best is a verbose mode in case of unsatisfied dependencies

After a while, depending on your Internet connection speed, you will be able to conclude the upgrade typing:

dnf system-upgrade reboot

Your laptop will reboot and the upgrade starts.

From now you spend more than 40 minutes waiting and answering to few easy questions that the OS asks you to solve some configuration matters.

The length of the waiting time depends obviously on the CPU, the RAM and the type of Hard Disk installed into your PC.

That’s it!

If you liked YUMEX, don’t miss YUM EXTENDER (DNF) for Fedora 22

If you are one of them (like me) that prefer to manage and/or install software through an easy to use GUI, don’t forget to migrate to the new version of the “old” YUMEX.
Open your favourite Terminal and type:
su
dnf install yumex-dnf

Follow the instructions that appear on the screen and enjoy the new DNF GUI manager for Fedora 22.

Update from Fedora 18 to 20 or 21 in few simple clicks and without (I hope) problems!

Fedora 21Sometimes simple things become hard problems. This happened to me when I discovered that my Fedora 18 OS was obsolete (very old indeed) and I tried to upgrade it to the Fedora 20 version.

Fedora 18 doesn’t support the automatic OS upgrade so I had to spend some hours to find information on Internet and create the right DIY solution for my case. At the end of my little (sic!) research I discovered that I was able not only able to upgrade the PC to Fedora 20 but I also found a good “trick” to upgrade to the latest Fedora 21 following in just a couple of steps with the help of fedup and some other escamotages.

This is how I succeed…

First, you have to open a Terminal and type:

su
init 3

but you will immediately leave the Fedora GUI and so it’s better if you write the below commands on an -old style, paper notepad- to be sure to have all the right information in you hands and correctly manage the upgrade from Fedora 18 to Fedora 20

sudo su -
yum update
yum install fedup
fedup-cli --network 20 --nogpgcheck

It’s better to add –nogpgcheck because often you are not able to complete your upgrade for the “old”, “bad saved” gpg key in your system.

reboot

Now, at the boot-up menu (GRUB 2 menu) you have to choose “System Upgrade (Fedup)”.

Then just to be sure you really have an up to date OS, in Terminal, type:

Yum update

If you have problems with one or more of your “old” repositories don’t forget to deconfigure them. In my case I had to launch this command line in Terminal due to skip an old repository and proceed with the upgrade:

yum-config-manager --save --setopt=home_moritzmolch_gencfsm.skip_if_unavailable=true

At this point, to upgrade from Fedora 20 to Fedora 21 you have to open (again) the Terminal and type:

su
fedup --network 21 --product=workstation --nogpgcheck

OR

fedup --network 21 --product=server --nogpgcheck

(if your Fedora version is the server one)

OR

fedup --network 21 --product=cloud --nogpgcheck

(for the Fedora cloud edition for generic virtual machines or Container)

Take it easy and go to bed for a long snap because, in my case, the download took some hours as for 2,577 files to be upgraded…

At the end, as before, you have to Reboot and select “System Upgrade (Fedup)” at the boot-up menu (GRUB 2 menu) and all the necessary files will be installed. Again, take a good book to read while you wait the installation.

Good luck and remind you MUST backup all your data before you start any upgrade because unforeseen risks are always around the corner!

References:

https://ask.fedoraproject.org/en/question/37247/upgrade-fedora-18-to-fedora-20-via-yum-or-fedup/

http://tecadmin.net/steps-to-upgrade-fedora-19-to-20-using-fedup-tool/

http://www.unixmen.com/upgrade-fedora-20-fedora-21-using-fedup/

https://ask.fedoraproject.org/en/question/39558/how-to-remove-a-repository-from-my-system

Using iPhone internet sharing over bluetooth under Linux

To use your iPhone’s internet connection through a Linux notebook over bluetooth, you have to open Tethering option on your iPhone device, under the Settings->General->Network section.

After that you can install Blueman (a simple and intuitive bluetooth manager) for easily configuring bluetooth PAN network:

apt-get install blueman

Start blueman-manager and find your mobile device and connect to it. When connection completed successfully, select Device->Add->Network Access Point in blueman-manager.
And the last step, configure the network interface:

dhclient bnep

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Ubuntu 10.10 is here but perhaps something is going wrong…

Since few hours, the new Ubuntu 10.10 is available for the download and installation. This version has some new tasks as a better look and a powerful Software Center that seems to be easier than ever also thanks to the feature “where is it?”.  Moreover, F-Spot has been substituted by the more powerful and complete Shotwell as main photo manager. The new sound menu included in Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat displays more useful information and song you are playing in Rhythmbox. Last but not least, some new delightful Themes and Backgrounds have been added.

On the weaknesses side, we focus our attention on the first paid application (It is really necessary? Do we need it?) and the hardware requirements. In fact reading the Ubuntu wiki the only requirement is a RAM of more than 256MB but Pleia2 and  WebUpd8 believe that the 10.10 version does not run properly on processor below i686 and this is a real uncomfortable limitation! Ubuntu has always run on all types of hardware (this is one of its main key features) and this news, if confirmed by tests, could influence users choice to other distributions as Knoppix or Fedora. We really hope that Ubuntu 10.10 will have just the declared 256MB of RAM limitation but today we have to ask ourselves if a new Knoppix era is coming. AddThis mp3 link

Skype 2.1.0.47 beta released!

Today, in our Linux Page (in Spanish), we posted some brief information about the new Linux beta version of Skype (2.1.0.47). The updated Skype distribution contains a new chat feature with an integrated SMS service. Also the audio and video codecs have been developed and a bluetooth option has been added. This beta release seems to be very stable and we hadn’t any problems during our tests. Skype released different versions related to main Linux distributions: Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, OpenSuse and a very useful tar.bz2 for all the other Linux versions. Recommended! AddThis mp3 link

PyTube: the best YouTube manager, downloader and video converter for Linux!

This week, in our Linux Page (in Spanish), we have posted a short review about PyTube, an opensource software which allows you to easier search, manage and convert your YouTube videos. Installing PyTube is very simple; for example, on Ubuntu you can directly add this software using the Synaptic Package Manager and marking it for installation from the menu (as usual, using the Search field you will reduce your searching time). The graphical interface is very simple and all the features can be intuitively understood. Using the search bar you are able to find all the related videos very rapidly, and you can select just the videos you desire to download. PyTube has also many interesting “minor” features like merge-rotate-resize video or -generate a ringtone- contained in the “Multimedia Tool” menu. Moreover PyTube is able to convert them to avi, in just a click. I found this software very useful to improve my Ubuntu knowledge and I recommend to all the people who need a flexible software to deeply navigate YouTube. Recommended! AddThis mp3 link