Category Archives: how to install Ubuntu

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Ubuntu GNOME 15.10: The perfect Linux desktop distribution

 

Hibernate for Ubuntu

Since the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS the hibernate icon disappeared as possible option at the shutdown. It is not a big loss if you are not used to use (or overuse) it as I often do. Personally I think that the hibernate feature is really useful when you want to freeze your computer maintaining all the windows -and the work- you are working on at a precise moment. 

Ubuntu decided to “cut” this particular command from its GUI because it registered a remarkable number of problems caused by hardware conflicts in modern computers. 

If you use Ubuntu and you think that hibernate could till be useful for you (especially during busy working days), it is possible to insert again this specific feature as GUI on your Desktop.

First of all you have to test if your computer contains the right hardware for “hibernate” so open Terminal and type:

sudo pm-hibernate

The computer will hibernate itself but you have to reboot it to understand if hibernate worked properly in your case.

I hope (as it was for my PC) that all has gone well. In this case you can start to create the dedicated icon on your upper bar.

Before of starting it’s necessary to understand that the hibernate command will use the SWAP partition to save your temporarily data. Usually it is recommended to have a SWAP partition with, at least, the double of space of your RAM.

So I suggest to install Gparted to check the SWAP space and, only if necessary, increase your SWAP partition reducing the primary partition. Please, do this only after you safely backup all the data in your computer because this procedure could be risky if you are doing it for the first time and you have not enough experience:

sudo apt-get install gparted

Open a Terminal and install gedit and gksu (if you don’t have them already installed on your machine) typing:

sudo apt-get install gksu && sudo apt-get install gedit
Then type:
sudo gksu gedit /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/com.ubuntu.enable-hibernate.pkla
Now a blank gedit document, named enable-hibernate.pkla will appear on your screen.

Copy and paste the following text to “compile” it:

[Enable Hibernate]

Identity=unix-user:*

Action=org.freedesktop.upower.hibernate

ResultActive=yes

Save it and reboot your computer.

A new icon will appear on the right corner of the upper bar. When you click on it, a Terminal window will appear asking for the system password. Type it and click on Return and your PC will immediately hibernate. 

Good busy working days!

How to install Ubuntu 12.04 on old computers with non PAE CPU

When I tried to install Ubuntu 12.04 on an old ThinkPad X40 I was surprised to discover this warning on my screen:

This kernel requires the following features not present on the CPU:
pae. Unable to boot - please use a kernel appropriate for your CPU.

In few words I wasn’t able to install Ubuntu 12.04 because the kernel on Ubuntu 12.04 was not supporting my CPU and I was really upset because I have always promoted Linux distributions as the most versatile and appropriate OS to keep using “old” hardware.

Sincerely, as described in an older post, I previously decided to install MATE desktop environment because the graphic cards on many laptops didn’t support Unity and Gnome 3 but this was the first time I had to renounce the installation of Ubuntu. I didn’t want to surrender to this difficulty (that appeared to me as a bug)!

First of all, I discovered that pae is “a feature to allow 32-bit x86 processors to access a physical address space (including random access memory and memory mapped devices) larger than 4 gigabytes“. After I clarified this point, I was not sure that my processor was totally inadequate to support Ubuntu 12.04.

After some web surfing I discovery that there are two easy solutions to avoid this problem.

1 – As first solution you can install Lubuntu (my choice) or Xubuntu on your computer then you can install the ubuntu-desktop using the Package Manager.

2 – If you prefer not to use the Package Manager you can install Ubuntu 11.04 or 11.10 and then upgrade Ubuntu to 12.04.

More in general, it is also possible to assume that if you have a non PAE CPU, your hardware could not be able to support the Unity desktop. For  this reason you can keep your Lubuntu – Xubuntu (based on the light but effective LXDE desktop) or switch your desktop environment to Gnome (the Classic, of course) installing the gnome package instead of ubuntu-desktop.

In any case, if you want to know if your CPU supports pae you have to open a Terminal and type:

grep --color=always -i PAE /proc/cpuinfo

If something like “flags: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8…” outputs on your Terminal, you have a pae CPU otherwise your CPU doesn’t support pae.  AddThis

How to install Ubuntu 7.10 on a USB Key!

Ubuntu 7.10After only few days from the release of Ubuntu 7.10, the pendrivelinux.com has released the new manual to install this new version of the famous Linux distro on a USB key and we have posted a short but effective review about this new manual on our Linux Page (in Spanish). As usual the instruction contained on the site are very clear and simple to follow. We have been able to create our Ubuntu 7.10 Key in less than 40 minutes and without any particular problem. Unfortunately, we were not able to save the changes we had made to personalize our USB key but we really enjoy the possibilities offered by a so powerful OS as Ubuntu (if someone knows how to save the changes, please, post a comment – Thanks). Strongly recommended! AddThis mp3 link

Lubi: the Linux based Ubuntu Installer

LubiLubi is a useful tool for all people who like to experiment different Linux OS on their PCs. In particular Lubi has been thought to let you install Ubuntu in just few clicks and without risking annoying “secondary effects” on your computer. In our Linux Page (in Spanish) we have posted a small but effective review with all the necessary links to the Lubi project and we have also listed all the Linux OS (PCLinuxOS 2007 32-bit, openSUSE 10.2 32-bit, Gentoo 2007.0 32-bit, etc..) already tested for a safe -Lubi- use. We strongly recommend Lubi for all users who want to deeply test Ubuntu (and its features) without starting from the Live CD. AddThis

Wubi: one of the best Ubuntu installers for Windows users.

Wubi HomepageToday, in our Linux page we have posted a brief review about Wubi: a simple and effective Ubuntu installer for Windows users. With just few clicks you can easily install Ubuntu without modifying the partitions on your pc (for this reason there are no -or very low- risks of “fatal errors” for your computer). All the Ubuntu files are stored in just a single folder so it is very simple to uninstall Ubuntu if you decide not to use it anymore. In few words, Wubi allows Linux beginners to try all the positive features of Ubuntu without risking undesirable secondary effects. Recommended! AddThis

How to solve upgrade problems in Ubuntu: some brief notes.

UbuntuYesterday a new version of Ubuntu (Feisty Fawn 7.04) has been released. This new version seems to be more powerful and enjoyable than the 6.10 and we hope it will actively contribute to spread the use of Linux. For people using Ubuntu 6.10, Ubuntu released simple and brief instructions to upgrade fast the OS.
In our Linux Page, we posted a brief tutorial about solving problems generated by an Ubuntu upgrade (this kind of problems is not common but unfortunately sometimes it happens..). The post, inspired some Italian blogs we found on the web, is very simple and effective and we hope it could be useful… in case of emergency. See you soon!