Category Archives: Noticias sobre Linux

How to Scan Your Linux Computer for Viruses and Rootkits by https://is.gd/Mcj0vO

Are you worried that your Linux computer may be infected with malware? Have you ever checked? While Linux systems tend to be less susceptible to malware than Windows, they can still be infected. Many times they’re less obviously compromised, too.

There are a handful of excellent open-source tools to help you check if your Linux system has been the victim of malware. While no software is perfect, these three have a solid reputation and can be trusted to find most known threats.

from https://is.gd/Mcj0vO

Selected by Galigio via Computer Borders

It’s time to find the best Linux Distro for your old laptop!

tuxAre you looking for a up-to-date Linux Distro to use that old laptop you have in the dust in the far corner of your garage? It could not be so easy to find the best Linux Distro to install on it but howtouselinux.net did some great twests for all us:

What is the best Linux distro for Laptop? 

The review is really well-done and the graphic display of results let you to quickly choose what is the best Distro candidate for your laptop depending on hardware, your tastes and the final use you want to give to your laptop.

In my experience the howtouselinux.net review let me to save a lot of time because I was able to focus my tersts just on the two Distros that seemed to have the right prerequisites for my old eeepc 900:  Peppermint OS and Macpup. Recommended!

375x150-embossed

 

“Username is not in the sudoers file. This incident will be reported…” How to add a specific user to sudoers on Linux

Sooner or later, if you use Linux and you prefer Terminal to GUI you will stumble on this message:

Username is not in the sudoers file. This incident will be reported

The first thing to clarify is that the “incident” will never be reported outside your computer but in the auth.log file. But if you have previously configured your Linux OS to send these kind of logs to you by email, you receive an alert about.. your own activity with sudo…

In any case, to solve the above mentioned specific sudo matter, use Terminal and type:

sudo gedit /etc/sudoers

At this point the text file “sudoers” will be opened and you will be able to modify it using e.g. gedit.

Obviously you can use another text editor you prefer as, for example, nano. In this case the command will be:

sudo nano /etc/sudoers

Now you have to peer into the text and find the “#User privilege Specification” section and add the command:

your-username ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL

where ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL stands for: allow the specific user (your-username) to access all the terminals, as if he/she were any other user, and allow him/her to execute the full range of commands.

And you will obtain something similar to this:

# User privilege specification
root ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL
your-username ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL

Try it! (..if you need…)

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References:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

How to install Ubuntu 12.04 on old computers with non PAE CPU

When I tried to install Ubuntu 12.04 on an old ThinkPad X40 I was surprised to discover this warning on my screen:

This kernel requires the following features not present on the CPU:
pae. Unable to boot - please use a kernel appropriate for your CPU.

In few words I wasn’t able to install Ubuntu 12.04 because the kernel on Ubuntu 12.04 was not supporting my CPU and I was really upset because I have always promoted Linux distributions as the most versatile and appropriate OS to keep using “old” hardware.

Sincerely, as described in an older post, I previously decided to install MATE desktop environment because the graphic cards on many laptops didn’t support Unity and Gnome 3 but this was the first time I had to renounce the installation of Ubuntu. I didn’t want to surrender to this difficulty (that appeared to me as a bug)!

First of all, I discovered that pae is “a feature to allow 32-bit x86 processors to access a physical address space (including random access memory and memory mapped devices) larger than 4 gigabytes“. After I clarified this point, I was not sure that my processor was totally inadequate to support Ubuntu 12.04.

After some web surfing I discovery that there are two easy solutions to avoid this problem.

1 – As first solution you can install Lubuntu (my choice) or Xubuntu on your computer then you can install the ubuntu-desktop using the Package Manager.

2 – If you prefer not to use the Package Manager you can install Ubuntu 11.04 or 11.10 and then upgrade Ubuntu to 12.04.

More in general, it is also possible to assume that if you have a non PAE CPU, your hardware could not be able to support the Unity desktop. For  this reason you can keep your Lubuntu – Xubuntu (based on the light but effective LXDE desktop) or switch your desktop environment to Gnome (the Classic, of course) installing the gnome package instead of ubuntu-desktop.

In any case, if you want to know if your CPU supports pae you have to open a Terminal and type:

grep --color=always -i PAE /proc/cpuinfo

If something like “flags: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8…” outputs on your Terminal, you have a pae CPU otherwise your CPU doesn’t support pae.  AddThis

Video – Instalar LibreOffice en Ubuntu 10.04/10.10 by orthusnet

AddThis

How to uninstall OpenOffice and install LibreOffice on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS

At the end I decided! I want to uninstall OpenOffice on my Ubuntu 10.04 LTS and substitute it with an always updated LibreOffice. After some researches on the web I decide to develop my own procedure to be sure that LibreOffice will be always updated with the last available edition.

First of all it is necessary to remove OpenOffice:

– go to System –> Administration –> Synaptic Package Manager –> Quick Search and type OpenOffice

– Mark for Complete Removal all the installed OpenOffice software and Apply  your choice, then exit the program

Now, open Terminal and add the PPA repository:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:libreoffice/ppa

Update the system:

sudo apt-get update Last but not least, go back to Synaptic Package Manager –> Quick Search and type LibreOffice

Select the LibreOffice software and all the add-ons you prefer then Apply  your choice.

That’s all! You have the last version of LibreOffice installed on your Ubuntu 10.04 LTS and you are also sure that Synaptic will update the packages when a new version is available! AddThis