Tag Archives: Sudo

“Username is not in the sudoers file. This incident will be reported…” How to add a specific user to sudoers on Linux

Sooner or later, if you use Linux and you prefer Terminal to GUI you will stumble on this message:

Username is not in the sudoers file. This incident will be reported

The first thing to clarify is that the “incident” will never be reported outside your computer but in the auth.log file. But if you have previously configured your Linux OS to send these kind of logs to you by email, you receive an alert about.. your own activity with sudo…

In any case, to solve the above mentioned specific sudo matter, use Terminal and type:

sudo gedit /etc/sudoers

At this point the text file “sudoers” will be opened and you will be able to modify it using e.g. gedit.

Obviously you can use another text editor you prefer as, for example, nano. In this case the command will be:

sudo nano /etc/sudoers

Now you have to peer into the text and find the “#User privilege Specification” section and add the command:

your-username ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL

where ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL stands for: allow the specific user (your-username) to access all the terminals, as if he/she were any other user, and allow him/her to execute the full range of commands.

And you will obtain something similar to this:

# User privilege specification
root ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL
your-username ALL=(ALL:ALL) ALL

Try it! (..if you need…)

——————-

References:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

How ro repair Ubuntu 10.04 LTS if the Update Manager and Synaptics don’t work

After I installed some new software I wasn’t able to update Ubuntu 10.04 LTS. The Update Manager was not able to check for updates and when I tried to use the Synaptic Package Manager I hadn’t better results. A reboot was not the right solution and I tested different ways to solve my problem saving the Ubuntu installation in my computer.

Searching on internet I discovered that there are few possible solution to avoid this problem and, in case you have the same bug on your computer, I decided to sum-up the most powerful after I successfully tried them.

First of all you can try to force the update process through the Terminal typing:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get upgrade

If this doesn’t work you will try with this next step:

sudo rm var/lib/dpkg/lock
sudo dpkg --configure -a

Then launch again the Update Manager to verify if you succeed and if nothing happened solve the matter typing:

sudo rm /var/lib/apt/lists/* -vf
sudo apt-get update

and try again to launch the Update Manager.

In my case this was enough to restore all the Update Manager features and solve the problem. If you have extra problems about this bug or if you want to suggest alternative solutions, please, don’t hesitate to comment this post. AddThis

Video – Fix .ICEauthority by danny6465

AddThis

Fix .ICEauthority problem at Linux boot up

After upgrading my Ubuntu 10.04 LTS I had an error window at every boot up session. The message advised me about:

Could not update ICEauthority file /home/username/.ICEauthority

ICEauthority is the Inter-Client Exchange (ICE) Protocol that allows  authentication, negotiation, setting up and taking down connections between programs. In few words, if two programs have the same cookies, they will talk and exchange data through ICEauthority.

To fix this matter open the Terminal and type:

ls -al

Then you find a line similar to this:

-rw——-  1 root        root           35226 2011-10-06 00:24 .ICEauthority

This means that your profile (username on a Linux OS) is not allowed to manage ICEauthority and you have to gain full permission to solve the boot up problem:

sudo chown username:username ~/.ICEauthority

Where username is your user profile on Linux.

Then type:

sudo chmod u+rw ~/.ICEauthority

To check if you succeeded, type again:

ls -al

and this time you will find a line like this:

-rw——-  1 username username    35226 2011-10-06 00:24 .ICEauthority

That’s all! AddThis

Video – Change GRUB menu list by curemind

AddThis

How to Change the Boot Order in Ubuntu

If you installed Ubuntu and Windows at the same time, you probably noticed that when you start your computer you can choose what operating system to launch. The responsible software for this is usually the GRUB loader and its menu. Obviously, after you install Ubuntu, it is placed as the first option and if you do not explicitly choose Windows in a few seconds, Ubuntu will be started. But what if you want Windows as your default option? Here is how you change the order:

1. Launch a new Ubuntu Terminal (Applications, Accessories). Type in the following command:

sudo cp /boot/grub/menu.lst /boot/grub/menu.lst_backup

This will create a backup of the GRUB configuration file.

2. Now open the file. We’ll do it with a new command:

sudo gedit /boot/grub/menu.lst

You will be prompted for a password, after which a text editor will be launched. In most of the situations, the menu.lst file contains many comments. You have to search for a line that says

default 0

This should not be very far from the end of file. Here you will have to intervene. After a few lines you will the variable called ‘timeout’ and its value (10 by default). If you want to have more or less time available for choosing your operating system, change the 10 with what number you want.

So back to the boot sequence. Scroll through the file again until you find:

title Ubuntu, kernel 2.6.17-10-generic

There will be more titles. Count the order number of Windows, but start from 0. The value you choose should overwrite the default one. For example, if Windows is the 4th title in the list, you will need to type

default 4

instead of ‘default 0’, which was described above. All you need to do at this point is to save the file and restart your computer. AddThis

How to Install Sopcast for free live TV in Ubuntu

Sopcast represents one of the most popular technologies for live TV streaming, being based on the famous p2p system. However, until recently, there was no version of this software for Ubuntu and Linux in general. But now every single user can enjoy live TV right on their desktop or laptop computer with this absolutely amazing program.

In order to install Sopcast on your machine, here is what you need to do:

1. Open a new terminal. This is a classic step and is used in most of the installation processes you will encounter in Ubuntu.

2. In order to add Sopcast to Synaptic (the package administrator software integrated into Ubuntu) you will need to type the following command:
sudo add-apt-repository ppa:jason-scheunemann/ppa

3. The next step is related to the update of the sources list. This can be done with the following command, which needs to be typed into the same terminal in order to achieve the right effects:
sudo apt-get update

4. Now you will need to run Synaptic in order to finalize the process. This is usually done through the System menu (System -> Administration -> Synaptic). Alternatively, you can use the following simple command:
sudo synaptic

5.  Look for the Sopcast package and install it. A very important step at this point is to not forget about all its dependencies. If you do not install everything, then Sopcast will not run correctly or not at all.

This is basically all you need to know if you want to install Sopcast on your machine. Whenever you need to run the player you can find it in the Application menu -> Multimedia -> Sopcast. You will surely enjoy the great variety of the channels available for every user through this system.

AddThis