Category Archives: Gnome tips

Start 2016 with a bunch of unusual Linux OS!

linux-distributions-to-look-forward-in-2016

What’s better than testing? For me nothing!

For this reason, let me introduce some “unusual” Linux distribution proposed by Jesse Afolabi @Jesseflb via Techmint.

VeltOS and PapyrOS are based on Arch but the last one is in its pre-alpha testing so it’s not suggested for beginners.

Moreover, we may decide to begin 2016 with Korora that is still one of my favorite projects also after so many years since the first release.

Last but not least, we have Solus OS 2 that it is not the most Linux distribution I tested but it is stable and really well built.

Happy 2016!

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Image: Jack Wallen

 

Ubuntu GNOME 15.10: The perfect Linux desktop distribution

 

Best Gmail Notifier For Ubuntu Linux by Videoorchard

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Searching a Gmail notifier for Ubuntu 10.04… an unpredictable Odyssey!

Finding a versatile Gmail notifier for my laptop seemed to be not so difficult and, after a first quick search, I selected a bunch of software I believed interesting. But when I tested them I was not satisfied by they behaviour especially because they didn’t have many of the features I wanted.

First of all I started installing the Gmail software I found in the Screenlets repositories on my Ubuntu but it was not able to update itself. Probably the firewall denied to the screenlet to communicate externally. I didn’t want to spend much time (sic) on the research of a Gmail notifier so I decided do uninstall it.

My second option was Popper and reading the program description I believed tha t was really the right one but.. after the configuration I was not impressed by the final flexibility and interaction this software offers. Just to know, for a quick configuration you need Popper configurator that is in the

The next step was represented by KCheckGmail that is for KDE and runs properly also on Gnome but, in this case, the program is not updated with the last Gmail configuration parameters and so it is nice but useless..

Then I tried with Gmail Notify. The configuration is quick and easy but it offers poor results. I mean that you have just the subject of new emails and no possibility to visualize them with a simple mouse click if you haven’t previously done the login of your Gmail account using the browser.

Finally I installed cGmail through the Ubuntu Software Center and I found what I was looking for: a simple program which let me know about new emails and let me open them with a click. The graphic interface is basic but after a couple of hours wasted on searching an effective solution I was satisfied!

Last but not least, if you don’t want to install a Gmail notifier directly on your Ubuntu, consider to install the add-on Gmail Watcher  on Firefox.

Please, if you have better solution and you want to share them with us, don’t hesitate to comment this post. Thank you! AddThis

CD Burning Applications for Ubuntu

There are not many applications for recording optical media under Linux. On the other hand, applications for Windows that allows a user to write a CD or DVD are numerous, but the most important difference is that those available on Linux are free and / or open source, with some exceptions. But all have basically the same purpose – to write or copy a disk.

In the world of Linux, the most common applications for burning optical media are usually pre-installed with the operating system chosen by the user. If not, they can be downloaded and installed easily on almost any platform.

Here are some of the most common such programs for Ubuntu:

Applications for Gnome / GTK

Brasero

Brasero is one of the most popular tools in the world of burning CDs. It usually comes pre-installed in most distributions that use Gnome. Brasero provides the user with a very friendly and simple interface while keeping all the important features needed by a user. Brasero is an application that requires minimal resources, providing maximum functionality, all integrated in one intuitive interface.

GnomeBaker

GnomeBaker is another GTK application with the same functionality as Brasero, but with a different interface. GnomeBaker gives the user an interface similar to Nero and K3B. The difference in use depends on the visual tastes.

X-CD-Roast

X-CD-Roast is an application to burn discs with its basic functions, but comes with a relatively primitive interface. Many users might find its interface as hard to use.

KDE Applications

K3B

K3B is probably one of the most popular programs available in the Linux world. It has many advanced features and options that would satisfy most users of such a program. It is available for both KDE and Gnome. Generally, K3B is regarded as the Nero of Linux.

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How to Install Inkscape on Linux (with special instructions for Ubuntu)

Inkscape is an open-source SVG editor with capabilities similar to Illustrator, CorelDraw, Visio, etc. Supported SVG features include basic shapes, paths, text, alpha blending, transforms, gradients, node editing, svg-to-png export, grouping, and more. Its main motivation is to provide the Open Source community with a fully XML, SVG, and CSS2 compliant SVG drawing tool.
These are the founding goals for Inkscape:
– Full SVG (plus XML, CSS2) compliance
– Core written in C/C++
– Gtk-based user interface following the standards set out in the GNOME Human     Interface Guidelines (HIG)
– Emphasis on a small core and extensibility. Usually Inkscape’s extensions are always first-class so we can say “no” to features in the core without guilt.
– Open, community-oriented development processes
– Baseline is the Sodipodi Hydra codebase
Where a better solution cannot be found, default to the way Illustrator does it.

Probably the easiest way to install on Ubuntu is to use the apt command.
Open a terminal and type;
sudo apt-get update (enter)
sudo apt-get install inkscape (enter)

  • Ubuntu Linux Development Versions

As it approaches release, nightly i386 and AMD64 builds of the latest Inkscape development version are provided at http://ubuntu.cafuego.net. On that site, one should select the appropriate Ubuntu or Debian release, then the Inkscape link, and finally the provided package. AddThis mp3 link Flattr this!

How to test Moblin 2.0 beta – an experimental Linux OS, optimized for Netbook and Mobile Internet Devices (MID).

Today, in our Linux Page (in Spanish) we posted a brief tutorial about the beta version of Moblin: a new Linux OS, -by the Linux Foundation and supported by Intel to increase the diffusion of its Atom processor- which has been developed especially for MID and Netbooks. Moblin, in its Beta version looks stable and full of features (Wimax included) and it is in constant development. At the moment we suggest to test it on a USB key. For this, after dowloading the .img file we can us imageWriter (Applications – Accessories – ImageWriter). If you need to install ImageWriter, please use Synaptics (System – Administration – Synaptics Package Manager) and in the search file type usb-imagewriter and install this program using the right button on your mouse. In our opinion, Moblin 2.0 beta, is realy well developed, all the menus are intuitive and easy to use and the graphics is more than sufficient. At the moment Moblin guys are testing this new version on Acer Aspire One, Asus eeePC 901, 1000H, Dell Mini 9, MSI Wind, Lenovo S10, Samsung NC10, HP Mini 1010 and 1120NR and we hope they could extend the Netbooks models in the near future. Recommended! AddThis mp3 link